Triple-Decker Baked Italian Cheese Sandwiches and Oregon Rosé

Some people search for the perfect wine to complement their food. We love to find the right food for our wine! The flowery, fruity notes of Oregon Rosé offer a pleasant flavor that instantly refreshes on those hot summer nights (or cold winter nights! It’s adaptable.) This triple-decker backed Italian cheese sandwich is an ideal accompaniment for a comfort-food indulgence any time of year.

Willamette Valley Wines | Oregon Rosé

Ingredients

8 plum tomatoes, halved lengthwise

¼ cup olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

1 tsp. thyme leaves

2 loaves bread (Italian, Pullman, etc.), ends discarded and sliced into 24 ½ inch thick pieces

1 pound sliced provolone

1 pound coarsely shredded Fontina

½ cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Steps

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Gently toss the sliced tomatoes with half of the olive oil and salt and pepper, then arrange cut side up on a baking sheet in a single layer. Bake for about 1.5 hours, then sprinkle with thyme and bake for an additional 30 minutes until very tender.
  2. Increase oven temperature to 375. Brush 16 slices of bread with the remaining olive oil and arrange 8 of them oiled-side down on a baking sheet. Top with provolone and 8 slices of plain, unbrushed bread. Top the plain bread with the Fontina, reserving some of the cheese for later. Add the tomatoes on top of the Fontina, then top with the other 8 slices of oiled bread, oiled side up.
  3. Bake the sandwiches for about 15 minutes, or until cheese is melted and bread is toasted.
  4. Turn on the broiler. Toss the remaining Fontina with the Parmigiano-Reggiano and sprinkle onto the sandwiches. Broil for approximately one minute, or until cheese is melted. Serve immediately.

These sandwiches are good all by themselves, or you can serve them with crisp, tangy pickles and crunchy potato chips, or a green salad. Willamette Valley wines, with fruity and floral aromas, complement the rich cheese and sweet tomato flavors to round out the meal.

The Rise of Rosé

Rosé is coming into its own. While this may be surprising to some beverage consumers, it makes perfect sense to sales analysts. And it looks like the trend is here to stay. Total orders climbed over 300% from 2015 to 2016 and continue to grow. There’s no doubt about it: “pink” is gaining popularity, especially among trendy young drinkers — and anyone who loves the appeal of crisp, clean, elegant wine.

Oregon Rosé | Rainstorm Wines

The upward rise of  is, in large part, attributable to a surprising source: greater numbers of male consumers. Rosé is usually touted as a woman’s drink, perhaps due to its color or because it is stereotyped as being overly sweet. Popular Rosés, though, can actually be quite dry. It is shedding its image as a “girly” wine and making inroads with serious wine lovers. And with bros.

Rose for Bros

So popular is this pink drink that a trendy portmanteau has emerged: Brosé. You know – rose for bros. A few brands have even created Rosés by that name. What’s the draw? Oregon Rosé options are unique; Willamette Valley wines are carefully crafted, and the blends of grapes used can lend the pink wines a structure more typical of reds. For many men, and for other wine drinkers, this puts Rosé into a class by itself and boosts its appeal — especially when the temperature creeps up.

Rainstorm Rosé is a forerunner in this class of crisper, drier Rosés. With an acidic finish and aromas of rose petals, strawberry, and pomegranate seeds, it is perfectly paired with salads full of freshly-picked greens and herbs, grilled chicken, and warm evenings on the patio. Summer months produce the highest Rosé sales, which makes sense– it’s the season for vacations, celebrations, impromptu gatherings, and picnics. Rosés are certainly indicative of rest and relaxation.

If you’ve been hesitant to try Rainstorm Rosé because it’s too sweet, too clingy, or too pink, you’ll be pleasantly surprised when you pour a chilled glass of the best Oregon Rosé. It will quickly become a summer staple.